Web Page for 2009 IAR Annual Report
Last updated at 3:20pm on 07/07/2009


Cover Page

HERE is the cover photo.

Caption: GLIMPSE/MIPSGAL image of the "Nessie Nebula," an extremely filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC). IRDCs host the earliest stages of high-mass star and cluster formation, and many pre-stellar evolutionary phases can be seen in the Nessie Nebula. The color scale shows 3.6 micron emission (blue), 8 micron emission (green) and 24 micron emission (red).


Introduction

This section is nearly complete. Still missing are the numbers (number of publications, grants, total dollar amounts) that need to be put in the 2nd and 3rd paragraphs.

HERE is the text for the introductory section in Word format.


Science Highlights

This section is complete.

HERE is the text for the section on the science highlights in Word format.

HERE is a picture to go with Jackson's science highlights.
Caption: A GLIMPSE 8 micron image of a typical Infrared Dark Cloud.

HERE is a picture to go with Brainerd's science highlights.
Caption: The image correlation function for ordinary bright galaxies in the SDSS, shown as a function of angular separation on the sky. The function takes on positive values when galaxy images have a tendency to point in the same direction (i.e., they are aligned with each other). The intrinsic alignments extend to very large physical scales (~ 10 Mpc) and are consistent with the predictions of the Cold Dark Matter model.

HERE is one picture to go with Bania's science highlights section.
Caption: Four new HII regions discovered by Professor Bania and graduate student Loren Anderson with the NRAO Green Bank Telescope. The spectra are composite HN-alpha recombination lines; they are the average of 7 alpha transitions at 3 cm wavelength. For the brightest sources the He and C transitions can also be seen. The right panels show Spitzer infrared images of the HII regions, each 5 arcmin on a side (red: MIPSGAL 24 micron emission; green: GLIMPSE 8 micron emission; blue: GLIMPSE 4.5 micron emission). The nebular kinematic distances are quite large. The two negative LSR velocity sources are HII regions located in the GCE-critical region beyond the solar orbit at Rgal ~ 9-12 kpc.

HERE is a second picture to go with Bania's science highlights section.
Caption: Face-on map of the locations of first Galactic quadrant Milky Way HII regions. Crosses mark the positions of previously known Galactic HII regions. Red triangles mark the positions of the newly discovered HII regions as of March 2009. The dotted line shows the Sun's orbit about the Galactic center. The full drawn line is the locus of tangent points. The wedge locates the zone of the BU-FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey. The discovery survey has increased the populations of GCE-critical HII regions located beyond the Solar Orbit by 800%.


Instrumentation Program

This section is complete.

HERE is the text for the instrumentation section in Word format.

HERE is a picture of Mimir and Brian Taylor.
Caption: Brian Taylor completing installation of Mimir on the Perkins Telescope. The carrier cart is being wheeled away from the stainless steel cryostat; the electronics box is mounted in the upper left. The two metallic cables leaving the cryostat below the electronics are high-pressure helium lines that are part of the closed-cycle refrigeration system that keeps the optics and detector cold.

HERE is a picture to go along with the Mimir instrumentation section
Caption: On-off spectral image obtained by Mimir of the deeply extincted star Elias 16, located behind the Taurus dark molecular cloud. Wavelength increases from about 2.9 microns on the left to about 5.5 microns on the right. The twin black stripes are artifacts of how these position-switched spectra are obtained and processed; the signal containing portion of the image is the white strip across the middle. Below the image are the spectra extracted from these data. At the lower left, the deep absorption from 2.9 to 3.8 microns wavelength is a solid-state feature produced by water ice, as might be found as mantles surrounding refractory dust grain cores. Similarly, the narrow absorption at the lower right is produced by solid CO ice, which can only exist at temperatures below 17 K. Professor Clemens plans to augment Mimir to be able to use these solid state features to measure magnetic fields localized to the insides of molecular clouds, in order to ascertain the importance of the field in cloud core collapse and star formation.

HERE is another picture to go along with the Mimir instrumentation section
Caption: L-band (3.6 microns) image toward the Orion molecular cloud and star formation region. This image was produced by subtracting two images, one offset from the other spatially (hence the black and white features). This 10x10 arcminute image is one of, if not the, largest instantaneous L-band images ever obtained and highlights the new L-band imaging mode that was commissioned for Mimir in Winter 2008/2009.

HERE is a picture of PRISM.
Caption: The Perkins Re-Imaging SysteM (PRISM) instrument mounted on the Perkins telescope.

HERE is a picture of the Horsehead nebula to go in the PRISM instrumentation section.
Caption: Image of the famous Horsehead nebula obtained by BU undergraduate student David Jones using PRISM in March 2009 as part of the class work for CAS AS441 (Observational Astronomy).

HERE is a picture of SOFIA to go in the HIPO instrumentation section.
Caption: SOFIA, NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, in the hanger at Edward's Air Force Base.


Science Programs

This section is now complete.

HERE is the text for the section on the science programs in Word format.

HERE is the first figure for Liz's science section.
Caption: Radio contours superposed onto the smoothed Chandra X-ray image of the galaxy cluster Abell 562. The cluster is undergoing a merger and the relative motion of the intracluster medium and the radio source host galaxy provides the ram pressure necessary to bend the radio lobes.

HERE is the second figure for Liz's science section.
Caption: Contours of Chandra X-ray emission for the galaxy cluster Abell 562 superposed on an optical R-band image taken with PRISM on the Perkins Telescope.

HERE is the third figure for Liz's science section.
Caption: Radio contours superposed on the residual Chandra X-ray image (the emission left after subtracting the average emission, revealing substructure) of the cooling flow galaxy cluster Abell 262. The radio emission corresponds with deficits in the X-ray emission, and four separate outbursts from the AGN are revealed. From top to bottom the observed frequencies are 610 MHz (GMRT), 330 MHz (VLA), and 235 MHz (GMRT).

HERE is a figure for TGB's science section.
Caption: SDSS image of a large, bright spiral "host" galaxy and its satellite galaxy. The satellite is the fuzzy blue object to the right, and slightly lower, than the large galaxy.

HERE is Fig. 1 for Clemens' science section.
Caption: Mimir deep image and stellar polarizations measured for a single 10x10 arcminute field. There are nearly 700 polarization vectors in this image, and together they reveal a magnetic field which is mostly uniform on the large scale, but highly wavy on smaller scales.

HERE is Fig. 2 for Clemens' science section.
Caption: Stacked grid representing 76 square degrees of the Galactic plane. Black dots are the 3214 zones that Mimir must survey in order to complete GPIPS. Colored boxes show zones observed to date, with colors representing when the data were collected. About 40% of GPIPS is now complete, with the remaining 60% to be completed in the next 4 years.

HERE is Fig. 3 for Clemens' science section.
Caption: Mosaic of 3x2 Mimir fields of view for a small section of the GPIPS survey, showing polarization vectors (color coded for signal-to-noise levels) overlaid on the deep co-added photometric image. Analysis of the magnetic field patterns revealed by the polarization vectors, along with information about the gas and dust along the lines of sight to the stars, will answer key questions regarding the role of the magnetic field in ordering how galactic clouds are assembled and how star formation is regulated.

HERE is a figure for Jackson's science section.
Caption: The complete GRS image of Galactic 13CO emission. The emission has been integrated over all velocities. Top panel: l=43 degrees to l=56 degrees. Middle panel: l=30 degrees to l=43 degrees. Bottom panel: l=18 degrees to l=30 degrees. The brightest emission is yellow and red, the faintest emission is blue and black. Note the complex, filamentary structure of the molecular clouds.

HERE is a figure for the Blazar Group's science section.
Caption: Multifrequency light curves and optical polarization light curve of the blazar AO 0235+164. The dashed line indicates the time of ejection of a bright superluminal knot.

HERE is a second figure for the Blazar Group's science section.
Caption: A time sequence of VLBA images of the blazar A0 0235+164 at 43 GHz. The motion of a superluminal knot is shown by the green line; the core of the blazar is shown by the red line. The knot is distinguished from the core by its polarization (yellow line segments showing the E-vector). The color scale shows polarized intensity with a maximum value of 0.165 Jy/beam.


Lowell Observatory Partnership

This section is complete.

HERE is the text for the Lowell partnership in Word format.

HERE is a student photo to put in the Lowell Partnership section.
Caption: BU undergraduate student Jessica Donaldson and the Perkins Telescope, AS441 field trip, March 2009.

HERE is a student photo to put in the Lowell Partnership section.
Caption: BU undergraduate student Alice Olmstead and the Perkins Telescope, AS441 field trip, March 2009.


Discovery Channel Telescope

This section will NOT be included in the 2009 report.


Advisory Board Review

This section will NOT be included in the 2009 report.


Future Activities

This section is complete.

HERE is the text for Future Activities in Word format.


Fiscal Report

This section is not complete.

HERE is the final version of the fiscal report in Word format.